Confession of Murder (2012)


My Blu-ray buying habits probably seem quite odd to most people. In short: I browse through Amazon, find a movie I've purchased and thoroughly enjoyed, and look through the site's recommended titles. If I stumble across something that sounds moderately enjoyable, I'll gladly add the flick to my cart - assuming the price is right. That's essentially how I stumbled across Byeong-gil Jeong's 2012 thriller Confession of Murder, a film that, according to its description, sounded like a typical South Korean thriller involving a serial killer and a seasoned but heavily flawed cop obsessed with bringing him down. In other words, it seemed like a sound purchase, and that's precisely why I bought it. However, I didn't expect to love it as much as I do. Scratch that, I absolutely adore it, flaws and all. No joke.

Here's the story in a nutshell: Detective Choi (Jae-yeong Jeong) seems like a pretty unhappy guy, and it's all because he let a sadistic serial killer slip right through his fingers. What's worse, the killer left an extremely unpleasant a scar on his gaunt, Billy Bob Thorton-esque grill. Years later, after the statute of limitation runs out on those grisly murders, the killer, Du-sok Lee (Shi-hoo Park), emerges from the shadows with a new book, which quickly becomes a national bestseller. Although Choi can't lay a finger on the guy, legally speaking, the victims' unstable family members plan to kidnap the good-looking slasher in hopes of getting a little well-deserved and long overdue revenge. However, things are soon complicated when a mysterious stranger named J claims that he's the real killer. Is Du-sok Lee a bald-faced liar, or is J just attempting to ride on the suave author's immaculately-tailored coattails? It doesn't take things very long to get really complicated and deliriously convoluted. Just the way I like it.

I expected something a bit more subdued and low-key when I sat down with Confession of Murder, but I was presented with something else entirely. The opening chase sequence assaults your senses with a delirious amount of shaky cam and lightning-quick cuts - it's enough to give Michael Bay unstoppable seizures for weeks. Things do slow down a bit once the time jump takes place, but the film itself never really takes the storyline seriously. It's overwrought, over the top, and weirdly humorous, although I'm not entirely sure that was intentional. Regardless, I was never bored during the flick's two-hour runtime, and I found myself a little disappointed when the end credits began to roll. I may not have liked it for the reasons the filmmakers intended, but it's currently one of the most enjoyable movies I've seen thus far this year. And that twist? I never saw it coming. But maybe that says more about my intelligence than the skills of the screenwriter. Regardless, I had a blast and wouldn't hesitate to watch it again.

Thank God for the folks at Well Go USA and their moderately-priced Blu-rays.

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